Stephen Rees's blog

Thoughts about the relationships between transport and the urban area it serves

Group irked by perimeter road

with 4 comments

The Province

There is no news in this piece. What makes it noteworthy is the growing distance between the Asper family and Gordon Campbell. The Province – and the rest of the canada.com stable – have been quite supportive of the BC Liberals in general. Although individual reporters and columnists do step outside now and again. And the Fraser Institute still has a special place in their opinion columns, and it is not unusual for Campbell to be chided for not being free market enough.

As you can see, the association is just beginning to learn what other community groups, primarily in Delta, discovered long ago — that there are many serious, valid concerns over this project that the Campbell government foolishly sticks to despite viable alternative routes.

Ah, so that’s all right then. We don’t have to oppose building freeways. Or question the non-existent case for port expansion or the Gateway. Just go for a different route.

But there is also quite a bit about John Les too – which is linked up to BC Rail and Ken Dobell. I think the sharks are sniffing blood in the water

(And as an aside have you noticed that 9 out of 11 columnists on the Province are white, older males? As one myself, I find this disturbing. We are not in the majority in society. Nor should we be as commentators in popular newspapers.)

Written by Stephen Rees

March 30, 2008 at 10:34 am

Posted in Gateway, politics

4 Responses

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  1. Aren’t the majority of politicians and CEOs white, older males?

    Erika Rathje

    March 30, 2008 at 3:38 pm

  2. Yes, and look at the mess that has got us into!

    Stephen Rees

    March 30, 2008 at 4:33 pm

  3. ‘Nuf said! :)

    Erika Rathje

    April 2, 2008 at 12:49 pm

  4. Erm – oddly enough I stumbled upon this

    http://www.portfolio.com/executives/features/2008/03/17/Sexism-in-the-Workplace?TID=st092007ab

    “in 1977, just 2.3 percent of the executives in U.S. firms were women. The book—a “groundbreaking” bestseller, according to the New York Times—was onto something big. Now, three decades later, 52 percent of all middle managers are women. “

    Stephen Rees

    April 10, 2008 at 7:54 pm


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