Stephen Rees's blog

Thoughts about the relationships between transport and the urban area it serves

$700/year for TransLink

with 8 comments

Abby News

Jeff Nagel calculates that

two-car family in Langley could soon be paying close to $700 a year more than their neighbours to the east in Abbotsford.

Due in part to the proposed vehicle levy. But also to the gas tax

Motorists already drive east out of Metro Vancouver to avoid the 12-cent gas tax that funds TransLink

But are gas prices 12c a litre cheaper? My recent experience suggests that the difference between GVRD gas pumps and Abbotsford is usually much less than 12 cents. But that of course is anecdotal so I checked on the cbc.ca gas price web page. They get gas prices from the gasbuddy.com – and the difference  when I looked was not 12c a litre but around 4c.

It seems to me – based on this unscientific survey – that gas stations in Abbotsford are doing very well out of the 12 c difference!

UPDATE March 30

I should have pointed this out when Ken Hardie posted a riposte. While Translink gets the product of 12c/litre from the gas tax, half of that is a transfer of the provincial collection. So the net effect is that gas tax is really 6c per litre higher inside Metro than most of the rest of BC

Written by Stephen Rees

March 18, 2009 at 8:01 pm

Posted in Transportation

8 Responses

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  1. Ah, don’t you worry Abbotsford folk, your provincial government has plans for you. They envision TransLink managing roads and assorted other public infrastructure for the entire region from Horseshoe Bay to Hope. Soon you will get to help pay for bridges you’ll never cross and subways you’ll never ride.

    David

    March 18, 2009 at 11:01 pm

  2. I agree with you, when the last time I went to Chilliwack for a ‘RFTV’ meeting, the prices in Delta (Otter Co-OP) on #10 highway, East Ladner, were a penny cheaper than the prices posted in Chilliwack!

    But David is right also, to get the tax base to pay for RAV, the Evergreen and Gateway, the entire Fraser Valley will be under the TransLink umbrella. I predicted this 5 years ago!

    Malcolm J.

    March 19, 2009 at 10:40 am

  3. I usually buy gas at Chilliwack when driving to and from the interior during the summer, but last summer there was one time when the gas in Vancouver was cheaper than the gas in Chilliwack – and by a substantial margin (more than 5 cents/litre).

    Ron C.

    March 19, 2009 at 12:32 pm

  4. @ Malcolm J. I enjoyed your letter in the latest Surrey leader paper, I admire your determination.

    Grant G

    March 19, 2009 at 4:09 pm

  5. Malcolm J–Mr. Rees–Thought you might be interested in this letter,Malcolm,you are probably aware of this already.

    http://www2.canada.com/deltaoptimist/news/letters/story.html?id=e6a523fb-ece3-4b94-9992-8dbd0fdbec21

    Grant G

    March 21, 2009 at 6:10 pm

  6. I messed up the link,a letter to the Delta optimist,more dumping on Delta.

    http://www2.canada.com/deltaoptimist/news/letters/story.html?id=e6a523fb-ece3-4b94-9991-8dbd0fdbec21

    Grant G

    March 21, 2009 at 7:09 pm

  7. The transit study out in the Fraser Valley is a desperate attempt by local politicians to hold off TransLink’s take over of transit services all the way out to Hope.

    Given TransLink’s financial situation though, I doubt it can work for long. Thanks to Skytrain, transit in Metro is like a hungry dragon. The rest of the Fraser Valley will soon be sucked in, and the same model that serves the south of the Fraser region so poorly will be extended! Skytrain to Langley here we come!!

    Steve

    March 22, 2009 at 10:07 am

  8. Grant, I have been predicting this for years and it’s my opinion that many will go back to the car. I have used my wife as one example no transfer journey to 3!

    Whiterocks residents are up in arms too!

    But my neighbor’s, who takes the bus, has now purchased a wee Metro for commuting, when the express buses expire.

    The whole episode shows TransLink’s incompetence in transit planning – forcing transfers on customers, where previously there was a no transfer journey is just plain silly.

    For the past 20 years, the no-transfer journey was the great philosopher’s stone for attracting new customers to transit. It will be very hard to attract new customers with a forced transfer …………. onto a subway (which has its own problems).

    Malcolm J

    March 24, 2009 at 6:16 am


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