Stephen Rees's blog

Thoughts about the relationships between transport and the urban area it serves

Arbutus Greenway Conversations

with 2 comments

There is nothing scientific about this: merely talking to the people we happen to meet when walking on the Greenway. I am astonished how much information people are willing to share. I think it is an affirmation of how effective the current work has been that people actually want to stop and talk about it. I have yet to meet anyone who opposes the use of black top. And on the section between 16th and 33rd where the work has been completed, I have only heard positive comments.

Today we met a woman who had been in charge of the work creating the BC Parkway (formerly the BCER right of way through Burnaby and New Westminster). She was most impressed by what has been done north of 33rd, where we met her, but was unaware of the opposition to the use of blacktop. She felt that rolled gravel was far inferior, and would be the cause of greater injury to cyclists.

“You come off on gravel, that’s gonna hurt!”

Rolled gravel greenway south of 33rd Ave

This is the unpaved surface south of the 33rd Avenue crossing: it is going to be like this all the way to South West Marine and beyond.

We also discussed the politics of the decision. There are some people who feel that the priority for City funds should be affordable housing, meeting the needs of the homeless rather than a public amenity for one of the wealthiest  neighbourhoods. “But this” she said, indicating the Greenway, “is going to be available to everyone. And it’s going to be a great place to teach children how to bicycle. I taught my kids to cycle in a cemetery. There’s not much traffic and they don’t drive fast there.” She was also unaware of the upcoming consultations, so I pointed her to the sign (actually now set up again but facing the wrong way) which has the URL of the city information piece.

“I’m going to buy a bench for it!” She had also not heard of the use of movable tables and chairs in New York City for places like Times Square.

We also met Gabriel, on his electric scooter. My partner wondered to me if he was in the wrong place – but I pointed out it was not a motor scooter, as it was silent! He told us that the scooter is speed limited [“no faster than 32 km/h on level ground“]. He was very pleased to see the improvement which eases his commute: he works in one of the houses along the way. We talked about the process of consultation. He was full of ideas about what could go along the greenway. Perhaps the most far sighted was his idea for a roundabout to replace the current complex double signals at 41st Ave and the Boulevards. He thought that a large enough public space in the middle would become a popular meeting place, if properly designed, and a great improvement in the urban streetscape.

Screen Shot 2016-08-10 at 5.56.23 PM

Earlier this week we met some people on bicycles, peering over the barriers at 16th Avenue where the gravel starts.

Rolled gravel Arbutus Greenway at 16th Ave north side

They were not inclined to proceed further, and turned around to retrace their route back up to Kerrisdale. They had some fairly pointed views on those who opposed the use of blacktop.

POSTSCRIPT I have just read another blog post in the form of a letter to Council on the issue from the perspective of someone who uses a wheelchair. Essential reading, I think,  for a number of reasons.

Written by Stephen Rees

August 10, 2016 at 7:08 pm

2 Responses

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  1. Public consultation is always important but accessibility should not be a matter of debate.

    Amen to that! (From the link in the postscript).

    MB

    August 12, 2016 at 12:48 pm

  2. Your post (especially the comment on the first picture) just illustrates how the city can be malintentioned and the public consultation rigged.

    Many will agree that the path you picture is not accessible but some know also that you don’t necessarily need blacktop to make a path accessible…and this include the blogger you mention, whose states:

    It is worth noting that paving is neither a guarantee nor necessarily a requirement for accessibility

    It is exactly what I argue in this post, where she incidentally picked up the comment which has upsetted her.

    What she argue in her letter is that the concept you have seen in the poachest Paris district:

    that is a “former railway turned into a nature park” make nonsesnse in a city… (see my blog to see that the “blacktop” war is not a Vancouver specific thing)…

    That is her opinion and that is fine: some will share her viewpoint, and some other will have a different view: Just have a public consultation about that (in Paris, the later view eventually won)…and yes accessibility should be a given …but the means to achieve it shouldn’t be…

    Voony

    August 13, 2016 at 12:08 am


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