Stephen Rees's blog

Thoughts about the relationships between transport and the urban area it serves

Archive for November 2016

How much do streets cost?

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cost-of-street

This graphic appeared in my Twitter stream today posted by Professor Chris Oliver of Anstruther, Scotland. I started following him merely because he happens to come from Forest Gate, but if you are on Twitter he is definitely worth a follow @CyclingSurgeon. The graphic is also Creative Commons.

Written by Stephen Rees

November 28, 2016 at 2:26 pm

Posted in Transportation

A Graphic File I Couldn’t Resist

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The original comes from The Independent – a uk newspaper

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I got this from the facebook page of Friends of the Olympic Line where I also found

 

Written by Stephen Rees

November 19, 2016 at 4:10 pm

Posted in Transportation

Google’s New App Can Digitize Your Old Photos in Seconds — TwistedSifter

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Google’s amazing PhotoScan app turns your phone into a digital scanner. Instead of taking a picture of a picture, the app creates an enhanced digital scan with automatic edge detection, perspective correction and smart rotation. It’s time to dig out that old box of photos!

via Google’s New App Can Digitize Your Old Photos in Seconds — TwistedSifter

And just to show how good it is I was able to capture this image from a block mounted print on the wall next to me.

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And in case you are wondering I got the app from the AppStore for my iPhone6

Written by Stephen Rees

November 18, 2016 at 12:49 pm

Posted in photography

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Photo Challenge: Magic

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via Photo Challenge: Magic

No, sorry I do not believe in magic. When I go to a magic show, all I want to do is figure out how the illusion is achieved. I did a search on my photostream, and the only references to magic that I found was my own reaction to an early effort at stitching pictures together – which at that time seemed almost magical to me – “hey, you can’t see the join” – but now my iPhone 6 can do that for me!

In 2010 I went on my first cruise, to the Caribbean, and in St Maarten we berthed next to a Disney ship.

Goofy touch up

I guess that’s as close to Magic as I am going to get.

Written by Stephen Rees

November 18, 2016 at 12:31 pm

Posted in photography

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Celebrating Roundabouts

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Admiral Blvd approaching roundabout

The stuff that turns up in my inbox rarely delights me. This did. Long time readers will know I want to see more roundabouts here. Not Traffic Circles. If you haven’t been following along here’s a bunch of posts on that theme.

Next Thursday afternoon (Nov. 17) the city of Carmel, Indiana will celebrate the opening of its 100th roundabout, giving the city far and away more of these European-style intersections than any other community in the United States.

Increasingly, cities are yanking their traffic lights in favor of European-style roundabouts.  They’re doing it for reasons that range from cost savings and traffic flow to safety and the environment.  As many as four times the number of cars move through a roundabout in the same time as a traffic light, and yet the number of injury-related accidents goes down by an astonishing 80%.  And because cars are not idling in long lines before launching again, each roundabout typically saves thousands of gallons of gasoline per year.

Championing these and other environmentally friendly developments in Carmel has been Jim Brainard, the city’s long-time Republican Mayor.  Labeled by one publication as a “rogue elephant,” Brainard was one of only four Republicans to sit on a large White House task force for climate change.  It’s a position that puts him at odds with many in his party — including, now most notably, the President-elect and his running mate, who of course is also Governor of his state.  The Mayor argues that concern for the environment has historically been a core Republican value.  And he’s supported strongly by his own constituents — overwhelmingly Republican and generally conservative — who last year elected him to his sixth four-year term.

 

Several years and dozens of roundabouts ago, CNN did a piece on Carmel’s roundabouts that you may find interesting.  Also, just a couple months ago the UK-based Roundabout Appreciation Society  named one of Carmel’s roundabouts “Roundabout of the Year,” including it in its annual calendar.

CNN: http://sms8.omniproductions.net/Carmel1/BrainardAndersonCooper340kbps.wmv

The New York Timeshttp://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/02/realestate/commercial/redevelopment-of-carmel-ind-has-a-european-flair.html?_r=0

On Earth: http://www.onearth.org/magazine/rogue-elephant

USA Today (Cover Story):  http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2012/10/16/small-towns-think-big/1637047/

The Economist: http://www.economist.com/node/21538779

 

Written by Stephen Rees

November 11, 2016 at 3:25 pm

Posted in Traffic, Transportation

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How Cities Should Be Designed

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screen-shot-2016-11-05-at-2-27-17-pm

This graphic was posted to Twitter by Professor Chris Oliver.

Written by Stephen Rees

November 5, 2016 at 2:31 pm

Photo Challenge: Chaos

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via Photo Challenge: Chaos

Hope Slide

This is the site of the Hope Slide

“The Hope Slide was the largest landslide ever recorded in Canada. It occurred in the morning hours of January 9, 1965 in the Nicolum Valley in the Cascade Mountains near Hope, British Columbia, and killed four people. ”

The present scene shows some of the debris field: I chose this image as the panorama shows the present more tranquil site, with vegetation returning. No-one would have survived if they had tried to photograph this event as the description of it in wikipedia makes clear.  It was chaos of a high order!

“The slide buried a Chevrolet sedan with two occupants, another car and driver, and a tanker truck and its driver under a torrent of 47 million cubic meters of pulverized rock, mud, and debris 85 metres (279 ft) deep and 3 kilometres (1.9 mi) wide, which came down the 2,000-metre (6,600 ft) mountainside. This mass of debris completely displaced the water and mud in Outram Lake below with incredible force, throwing it against the opposite side of the valley, wiping all vegetation and trees down to the bare rock, then splashed back up the original (now bare) slope before settling.”

Written by Stephen Rees

November 5, 2016 at 11:45 am

Posted in photography

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