Stephen Rees's blog

Thoughts about the relationships between transport and the urban area it serves

Posts Tagged ‘Earth Day

Weekly Photo Challenge: Earth

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When I first saw the challenge for this week I was thinking of looking for one of my gigantic panoramas. But then as I was scrolling through Photos on my MacBook I saw this little snapshot. We were walking around the Cleveland Dam and Capilano park, when I saw this skunk cabbage emerging from the earth. That does look like a particularly fecund bit of ground – lots of naturally composting plants and detritus from the forest. And that fern is really artistic, don’t you think?

We have had almost continuous rain here for months – and the chance to get outside during the brief dry spells is eagerly grasped. Spring has been late, but all around things are emerging and blooming as the warmth returns – if not much actual direct sunshine.

We need to keep in mind how much we depend on earth. The fact that we have anything to eat at all depends on a few inches of topsoil and dependable rain. But humans seem to be very bad at understanding that this is very fragile and easily broken. There might be water on a moon of Saturn, but that does not give us any realistic alternative to taking better care of the Earth we inherited and are so lucky to have survived our ill treatment thus far.

Written by Stephen Rees

April 19, 2017 at 12:44 pm

What to do on Earth Day

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In the spirit of reduce, reuse, and recycle, I have decided to recycle the contents of my inbox

To distance itself from public outcry over unsustainable development practices, Surrey Mayor Dianne Watts and her council have created a private land development corporation and charged it with responsibility for paving what remains of the former Class 1 Environmentally Sensitive Area known as Stokes Pit, a critical part of the Little Campbell Watershed (contains tributaries of the Little Campbell River, one of BC’s 13 most endangered rivers) and the vulnerable Brookswood Aquifer.

In addition to serving as regionally important wildlife and fisheries habitat, the area is surrounded by some of the largest parcels of farmland in Langley and Surrey, farms that won’t remain large or viable if industrial development forces roads and increased diesel pollution onto them.

Please attend the public information meeting – ironically, being held on Earth Day, Tuesday, April 22nd 5:00 to 8:00 p.m. East Kensington Elementary School 2795-184 Street (28th Avenue & 184th Street in South Surrey) Parking is limited, so please carpool if possible

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Five Ways to Celebrate Earth Day
Earth Day is April 22. What are you doing to mark the occasion? There are many ways you can say “Thank You Earth!” for everything it gives us, from air and water to food and shelter.
Here are our top five picks.

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Smithsonian.com is celebrating the 38th anniversary of Earth Day by launching the EcoCenter for Greener Living. This addition to the site features Web exclusives and eco-friendly tips from their new environmental content partner, Low Impact Living. For more information visit: www.smithsonian.com

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“By saving the woodland caribou’s remaining Boreal Forest habitat, we’ll also help protect one of the world’s largest natural carbon reserves and slow the effects of climate change.”

thegreenpages.ca network is working with the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society to help gather signatures to convince the Federal Government to identify and protect Woodland caribou habitat under the Species at Risk Act.

UPDATE: NEW YOUTUBE VIDEO!!!
Caribou and you: The bomb

Let us know what you think and sign the petition to help protect the Woodland caribou habitat under the Species at Risk Act.

Helping out and showing your support is really easy to do. For more information, visit www.caribouandyou.ca

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Today, in honor of Earth Day, we’ve found a pretty excellent website that gives fresh meaning to recycling. Swaptree — started by Greg Boesel and Mark Hexamer in 2004 to help people barter things — is remarkably simple to use: You sign up for an account (“join us in 8 seconds”), then rifle through your books, CDs, DVDs, and video games to find the ones with which you’re dying to part. Put them up on Swaptree (by typing in the UPC code or ISBN number), and the site instantly shows the items you can get in return — you pay only shipping, which Swaptree handily calculates for you.

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To celebrate Earth Day and encourage more members to participate, starting today and for the rest of the month of April, Aeroplan will match all miles redeemed for carbon offset credits by 25% instead of the usual 20%. The credits will then be transferred to the Carbon Reduction Fund, an independent, non-profit organization with the mission of funding only the highest-quality offset projects.

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Take Action For the Adams River Salmon!

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UPDATE 1:15 PM CBC is now reporting that the Marina Plans have been cancelled

Faced with the massive public opposition, developer Mike Rink of New Future Building Group told the crowd his company had cancelled the marina project.

Good. Massive public opposition works. Let us take heart from this and the defeat of the private sector power projects in a provincial park. Rafe was right. The environment is back!

Written by Stephen Rees

April 22, 2008 at 10:58 am

Posted in Environment

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